Multitasking vs. Dedication

With all the electronic gadgets plugged into our different body parts multitasking becomes the new way of life. I have read many articles about how successful people multitask, as if multitasking is a feature of smart people. I always doubted the efficiency of multitasking and had a question in mind, does multitasking slow our productivity? According to an article published in The New York Times it does; “While multitasking may seem to be saving time, psychologists, neuroscientists and others are finding that it can put us under a great deal of stress and actually make us less efficient.”

I sometimes multitask, I am not proud of it but at least I admit it is a bad habit and I try to get rid of it. I know for sure it slows my performance while studying. I believe in dedication and spending quality time to finish a task. I have seen grown educated men interrupt their face-to-face conversation to answer a phone call without even excusing themselves as if phone calls have priority 0 (0 being most important). I have seen people texting while driving and I have seen others reading a paper while driving, for real. If there is a slow car in front of you there is a 90% chance that the driver is speaking on his/her cell phone. So, we can’t say that multitasking is good. Actually, it is never proven that multitasking is good or improves performance and productivity.

Because we are used to multitasking, our time span becomes shorter and shorter especially, for those of us who do their work using their laptops. We juggle between doing real work, surfing internet, blogging or reading blogs, checking emails, checking facebook, twittering, etc. in one sitting. There is no way a multitasker can be as productive as a non-multitasker.

Many of us may have seen multitaksers during Friday Khutba (speech). Those people sleeping while supposedly listening to the Khutba. But recently there is a new kind of multitaskers they are those texting while attending Friday Khutba. Dedication people, ded.i.ca.tion!

7 thoughts on “Multitasking vs. Dedication

  1. Let’s put efficiency aside. Out of personal experience, I enjoy dedicating time for a task to feel the joy of achievement plus it makes any task easier and less time consuming but again that’s efficiency.

    1. I guess we are on the same page here. You are right dedication gives you the joy of achievement. For some reason I didn’t notice your avatar/logo before, it is very creative. Three different peoples holding their hands to ensemble the Jordanian flag. That is really nice.

  2. I just started using it couple of months ago. It’s actually a logo for one of my halted projects. We had some plans to build out own Ubuntu version and name it Nashmi, so we designed the logo and started the project. At some point, many institution were interested in funding us but then the credit crunch crunched us and now I resigned from IT for good, back to Politics.

    http://Nashmi.org/

  3. I hear you on the multitasking thing – especially while sitting by a computer. And in these thesis-writing times it becomes even worse. You know what you are supposed to be doing but, hey, I could always just check my FB, write a blog post or read some, check my email or the news… All of these things all of a sudden becomes very important tasks even though they clearly are not. Damn.

    1. Yes, the distraction these days is humongous. I wish I can apply the fun theory (http://www.thefuntheory.com/) into my dissertation writing skill, or lack of it. If only there is a way to make writing thesis or dissertation fun. Every time your word editor advances to the next page (i.e., you are done writing a full page), the genie pops out of the laptop speakers to take you for full three hours any where in the world you wish to go to. I think I will not stop writing. Okay, I have to stop day dreaming and go back to reality.

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