Blackwater mercenaries hired by Abu Dhabi – Highlights from the biggest story in the MiddleEast

If you are rich you have the right to defend your wealth. If you can’t defend it yourself then you have the right to hire people to do it for you. But the decision of Abu Dhabi to hire Blackwater Worldwide, who changed their name to Xe because of the documented abuse including their criminal role in killing 17 Iraq civilians, is outrageous [source]. It seems the Middle East will for ever be in the front page of the international newspapers headlines.

Blackwater Worldwide is a private American military company that hires mercenaries. Mercenaries are civilians who kill people for money. Some mercenaries, not linked to Blackwater, latest criminal work can be seen in Libya after Qaddafi hired African mercenaries to kill his people.

Here are my highlights of this big story:

Who are those mercenaries?

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates — Late one night last November, a plane carrying dozens of Colombian men touched down in this glittering seaside capital. 

The Colombians had entered the United Arab Emirates posing as construction workers. In fact, they were soldiers for a secret American-led mercenary army being built by Erik Prince, the billionaire founder of Blackwater Worldwide, with $529 million from the oil-soaked sheikdom.

The former employees [of Blackwater] said that in recruiting the Colombians and others from halfway around the world, Mr. Prince’s subordinates were following his strict rule: hire no Muslims.

Muslim soldiers, Mr. Prince warned, could not be counted on to kill fellow Muslims.

Why the founder of Blackwater left USA to live in UAE?

Mr. Prince, who resettled here last year after his security business faced mounting legal problems in the United States, was hired by the crown prince of Abu Dhabi to put together an 800-member battalion of foreign troops for the U.A.E., according to former employees on the project, American officials and corporate documents obtained by The New York Times.

For Mr. Prince, the foreign battalion is a bold attempt at reinvention. He is hoping to build an empire in the desert, far from the trial lawyers, Congressional investigators and Justice Department officials he is convinced worked in league to portray Blackwater as reckless. He sold the company last year, but in April, a federal appeals court reopened the case against four Blackwater guards accused of killing 17 Iraqi civilians in Baghdad in 2007.

Why those mercenaries are hired?

The force is intended to conduct special operations missions inside and outside the country, defend oil pipelines and skyscrapers from terrorist attacks and put down internal revolts, the documents show. Such troops could be deployed if the Emirates faced unrest in their crowded labor camps or were challenged by pro-democracy protests like those sweeping the Arab world this year.

People involved in the project and American officials said that the Emiratis were interested in deploying the battalion to respond to terrorist attacks and put down uprisings inside the country’s sprawling labor camps, which house the Pakistanis, Filipinos and other foreigners who make up the bulk of the country’s work force. The foreign military force was planned months before the so-called Arab Spring revolts that many experts believe are unlikely to spread to the U.A.E. Iran was a particular concern.

How about professionalism and ethics of those mercenaries?

The Emirates wanted the troops to be ready to deploy just weeks after stepping off the plane, but it quickly became clear that the Colombians’ military skills fell far below expectations. “Some of these kids couldn’t hit the broad side of a barn,” said a former employee. Other recruits admitted to never having fired a weapon.

Making matters worse, the recruitment pipeline began drying up. Former employees said that Thor struggled to sign up, and keep, enough men on the ground. Mr. Rincón [one of the mercenaries] developed a hernia and was forced to return to Colombia, while others were dismissed from the program for drug use or poor conduct.

On a recent spring night though, after months stationed in the desert, they boarded an unmarked bus and were driven to hotels in central Dubai, a former employee said. There, some R2 executives had arranged for them to spend the evening with prostitutes.

So, what is the next step?

Emirati military officials had promised that if this first battalion was a success, they would pay for an entire brigade of several thousand men. The new contracts would be worth billions, and would help with Mr. Prince’s next big project: a desert training complex for foreign troops patterned after Blackwater’s compound in Moyock, N.C. But before moving ahead, U.A.E. military officials have insisted that the battalion prove itself in a “real world mission.”

Finally, to be fair, UAE imposed some kind of questionable ethics on the mercenaries:

The contract includes a one-paragraph legal and ethics policy noting that R2 should institute accountability and disciplinary procedures. “The overall goal,” the contract states, “is to ensure that the team members supporting this effort continuously cast the program in a professional and moral light that will hold up to a level of media scrutiny.”

Shouldn’t this story been called UAE-gate?

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/15/world/middleeast/15prince.html?_r=1

2 thoughts on “Blackwater mercenaries hired by Abu Dhabi – Highlights from the biggest story in the MiddleEast

Comments are closed.